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David Davies denies he is homophobic From The Argus

Regardless of whether parents want their children to be gay (I personally couldn’t give a monkey’s as long as they’re happy), some children are going to be gay.

Given that fact, I’m sure those parents would prefer their children to be able to get married to the person they love and want to share their life with.

Given that fact, I’m sure those parents would prefer their children to be able to get married to the person they love and want to share their life with. And if a religious organisation, like the Quakers and some liberal synagogues, want to perform the ceremony, who the hell is David Davies to say they can’t?

Totally aginst this legislation which will be an open door for the look at me im gay brigade and i will get married in your church like it or not, a bitlike the hoteliers who have recently seen their wishes and beliefs trampled in the name of gay diversity and equality, your gay get over yourselves but dont ram your ways down our throats, we really arent interested, and good luck with this down the mosque, the locals will burn it down before a gay wedding happens there, its just asking for trouble.

[quote][p][bold][/bold] wrote:

Regardless of whether parents want their children to be gay (I personally couldn’t give a monkey’s as long as they’re happy), some children are going to be gay.

Given that fact, I’m sure those parents would prefer their children to be able to get married to the person they love and want to share their life with.

If you provide a business service, you can’t pick and choose who you supply it to on the basis of their race, gender or sexual orientation, whether you run the business from home (like the B or not.

But if you provide a religious experience, like marriage, then you CAN pick and choose who you provide it to. Churches and mosques are absolutely allowed to discrimate in this area, and I completely support their right to do so. There are churches that won’t marry divorcees, for example, or infertile couples.

Some divorcees have tried to play the “Human Rights” angle on this at the EU, but ironically, that very same Human Rights Act is what protects churches (and mosques) from having to conduct ceremonies that go against their faith (Article 9, Freedom of Conscience)

So, without significant changes to the Human Rights Act, there is no legal way for churches or mosques or synagogues to be forced to conduct gay weddings. It just lets those who want to do so, crack on in peace. canada goose jacket It’s been the law in a lot of countries (Spain, Argentina, Canada.) since 2000, and to my knowledge no one has been able to make a church do a gay wedding. It’s just scaremongering.

I understand the confusion, but this is nothing like the hoteliers case, and the legislation applies equally to mosques.

If you provide a business service, you can’t pick and choose who you supply it to on the basis of their race, gender or sexual orientation, whether you run the business from home (like the B or not.

But if you provide a religious experience, like marriage, then you CAN pick and choose who you provide it to. Churches and mosques are absolutely allowed to discrimate in this area, and I completely support their right to do so. There are churches that won’t marry divorcees, for example, or infertile couples.

Some divorcees have tried to play the “Human Rights” angle on this at the EU, but ironically, that very same Human Rights Act is what protects churches (and mosques) from having to conduct ceremonies that go against their faith (Article 9, Freedom of Conscience)

So, without significant changes to the Human Rights Act, there is no legal way for churches or mosques or synagogues to be forced to conduct gay weddings. It just lets those who want to do so, crack on in peace. It’s been the law in a lot of countries (Spain, Argentina, Canada.) since 2000, and to my knowledge no one has been able to make a church do a gay wedding.

If you provide a business service, you can’t pick and choose who you supply it to on the basis of their race, gender or sexual orientation, whether you run the business from home (like the B or not.

But if you provide a religious experience, like marriage, then you CAN pick and choose who you provide it to. Churches and mosques are absolutely allowed to discrimate in this area, and I completely support their right to do so. There are churches that won’t marry divorcees, for example, or infertile couples.

Some divorcees have tried to play the “Human Rights” angle on this at the EU, but ironically, that very same Human Rights Act is what protects churches (and mosques) from having to conduct ceremonies that go against their faith (Article 9, Freedom of Conscience)

So, without significant changes to the Human Rights Act, there is no legal way for churches or mosques or synagogues to be forced to conduct gay weddings. It just lets those who want to do so, crack on in peace. It’s been the law in a lot of countries (Spain, Argentina, Canada.) since 2000, and to my knowledge no one has been able to make a church do a gay wedding. It’s just scaremongering.

The Gwent MP said on his Twitter account:”Once got knocked around the ring by gay boxer. Respect like, so not bigoted”.